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Jen’s Top Ten’s: My Favorite Songs by The Story So Far

You know, it’s really hard for me to believe that there was ever a time in the pop punk world when The Story So Far didn’t exist yet. They formed in 2007, and have since released three studio albums and two EP’s. As of April 2017, they are in the studio working on their fourth studio album (WHICH I AM SO EXCITED FOR, BTW). It only feels right that on this edition of Jen’s Top Ten’s I talk about my favorite songs by The Story So Far (thus far).

***UPDATE*** as of 9/13, they have released a new song!

1.) “Nerve”

This song kicks ass, to say the least. This was the first single off of their self-titled LP, which came out on May 9th, 2015. This song takes us through the whirlwind of emotions that lead singer Parker Cannon is feeling, including sadness, anger, and confusion. One thing that really ties this song together (well, most of their songs) is the way that Parker sings. Well, it’s more of a yell — not to be confused with screaming, because their music is not screamo. The yelling style of their songs really convey the message of anger and angst, which makes TSSF a go-to for me when I’m feeling particularly livid.

2.) “Things I Can’t Change”

This song follows Parker again as he is struggling to be in a relationship with a girl while he’s on the road. Hence, the things he can’t change. The two had to go their separate ways, and that kills Parker.

3.) “Right Here”

There’s just something about this song that really draws me in. Maybe it’s the jump right into the chorus straight from the beginning of the song. Or perhaps it’s the instrumentals itself. Honestly, all TSSF instrumentals kick ass.

4.) “The Glass”

Everything about this song gets me hyped AF. From the beginning chords to the fast paced drums, this song doesn’t wait for anyone — it’s a headbanger all the way through. It’s a Warped Tour classic, tbh. I’d play this song at my wedding if it weren’t for the lyrics, which follow a failed relationship. Yeah, that’s probably not the best choice for a wedding.

5.) “Roam”

A common theme throughout all of TSSF’s discography is the lyrics — they’re all pretty much about breaking up with a girl, a failed relationship, and how this relationship affected his life. It seems monotonous just writing that, but I swear that it doesn’t feel monotonous when listening to it.

6.) “Quicksand”

I’m not gonna lie — I’m that person that sometimes can’t sit through a song before skipping it. But for some reason, I never skip this song when it comes on. I actually listen to it all the way through for a couple of different reason. One being that there are no lulls that drag this song out, but the lyrics are enjoyable to listen to. He equates the feeling of being drawn back to this girl with quicksand, which as we know is loose wet sand that sucks in anything that happens upon it). I love the imagery that this song creates, which is why I love this song.

7.) “High Regard”

I love this song because it’s so unapologetic. A lot of their other songs speak about Parker messing up and being hurt, but in this song, he’s the one that’s fed up with this manipulative relationship. He realizes that he’s not the one that is always messing up, and that this girl would overreact over the pettiest things.

8.) “Placeholder”

In this song, TSSF takes a break from the heavier guitars and bring in an acoustic guitar. Don’t get me wrong, though — there are still some electric guitars strumming along in the background. This is another song that I love the lyrics on. The main theme is setting sail from this relationship, freeing his anchor and sailing to wherever he pleases. Again, this is another song that really paints a nice scene.

9.) “Navy Blue”

Ugh, I love this song. I wrote about it more in depth on day 1 of my 30 Day Song Challenge, but I’ll go ahead and give a little recap. Basically, the girl that he was in love with has moved on and he is still pining after her. Starting to see a trend? Paired with the soft acoustic guitar, this song offers a pretty somber vibe.

10.) Clairvoyant

Unlike all their other songs, this song follows a mutual breakup. The acoustic guitar strums softly in the background, and Parker’s voice is less yell-y than it is in their other songs. This to me really emphasizes the fact that he’s not angry at his ex, but rather they came together on the same terms and decided it was best to separate.

My favorite line and biggest takeaway from this song is “Don’t paint me black when I used to be golden.” This really highlights the whole “ending on good terms” point. Obviously, it’s ending because something isn’t right about it anymore — but at one point it was golden, and Parker wants his ex to remember that.